Bethlehem United Methodist Church
Saturday, September 23, 2017
Mission Statement: To give of ourselves so others may know Jesus Christ.
 
 

About Us

 
 
The United Methodist Church was formed with the merger of the Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church in 1968. United Methodists trace their spiritual heritage back to 18th-century evangelical leaders John and Charles Wesley, Jacob Albright and Philip William Otterbein.
 
United Methodists speak many languages and live in many countries with many different cultures, ethnic traditions, national histories and understandings of Christian faith and practice.
 
We are people dedicated to a life of participation, personal responsibility, generosity, sacrifice and self-restraint, responding to the call of Jesus Christ.
 
 
 
 We are a covenant community, concerned about God's children everywhere. In life's clouds of doubt and division, we see the sunlight of God's purpose bringing healing, harmony and hope.
 
We love worship, study of God's word, music, potluck dinners and a sense of community, a sense of belonging.
 
 We welcome people of faith into our churches, and especially people who are searching for answers to life's tough questions, because we know what it's like to feel alone, unsure..... to need a welcoming place with open hearts, open minds, open doors.
 
We live the promise we made the day we joined the United Methodist church..... the promise of our prayers and our presence..... our gifts and our service.
 
 
 
This painting is the front piece of the sanctuary of Bethlehem Church. This large 7' x 11' picture was painted by a former pastor, Rev. Dr. C. Guy Stambach (1895-1972), who served this congregation during the late 1940s.
 
It carries the title: "Come Unto Me", and is a depiction of the famous invitation of Jesus in Matthew 11:28: "Come unto me all ye who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest."
 
Pastor Guy, "The Painting Pastor", produced over 330 works during his career, often rising at 4:30 am to paint, then beginning his pastoral work at 9 am.
 
The bulk of his pictures may be found in Central Pennsylvania, and hang in many United Methodist Churches, as well as other denominations across the nation, as far as Washington State.
 
Many persons have shared a great sense of comfort and peace as they have gazed at this painting through the years.